EFA-AR - Local Wellness Program

Code: EFA-AR
Adopted: 8/13/97
Re-adopted: 10/25/17
 

The district’s comprehensive age-appropriate nutrition program will be implemented in district schools in accordance with the following requirements:

Definitions

  1.  “Accompaniment foods” means food items served along with another food to enhance palatability such as butter, jelly, cream cheese, salad dressing, croutons and condiments.
  2.  “Combination foods” means products that contain two or more components representing two or more of the recommended food groups: fruit; vegetable; dairy; protein; or grains.
  3.  “Competitive foods” means any food or drink sold in competition with the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and/or School Breakfast Program (SBP) during the school day.
  4. “Entree item” means an item that is either:
A combination food of meat or meat alternate and whole grain rich food; or
A combination food of vegetable or fruit and meat or meat alternate; or
A meat or meat alternate alone with the exception of yogurt, low-fat or reduced fat cheese, nuts, seeds and nut or seed butters and meat snacks (such as dried beef jerky); or
Grains only when served in the SBP.
  1.  “Food service area” means any area on school premises where NSLP or SBP meals are both served and eaten, as well as any areas in which NSLP or SBP meals are either served or eaten.
  2.  “Meal period” means the period(s) during which breakfast or lunch meals are served and eaten, and as identified on the school schedule.
  3.  “Nutrition education” means a planned sequential instructional program that provides knowledge and teaches skills to help students adopt and maintain lifelong healthy eating habits.
  4.  “Oregon Smart Snacks Standards”1 means the minimum nutrition standards for competitive foods and beverages.
    1.  Food items, including accompaniment foods, must:
      1.  Be a grain product that contains 50 percent or more whole grains by weight or have as the first ingredient a whole grain (e.g., flour, flake or meal); or
      2.  Have as the first ingredient, one of the non-grain major food groups: fruits; vegetables; dairy or protein foods (e.g., meat, beans, poultry, seafood, eggs, nuts, seeds); or
      3.  Be a combination food that contains one-quarter cup of fruit and/or vegetable; or
      4.  Have one of the food items above as a second ingredient if water is the first ingredient; and
      5.  Meet:
        1.  Calories: all the competitive food nutrient standards:
          1.  Snacks contain no more than:
            1.  150 calories as packaged or served for elementary level;
            2.  180 calories as packaged or served for middle school level; and 3) 200 calories as packaged or served for high school level.
          2.  Entrees contain no more than 350 calories as packaged or served.
        2.  Total fat: contains 35 percent or less of total calories from fat per item as packaged or served. Exemptions to the total fat standard are granted for reduced fat cheese and part- skim mozzarella cheese, nuts, seeds, nut or seed butters, products consisting of only dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fat and seafood with no added fat.
        3.  Saturated fat: contains no more than 10 percent of total calories from saturated fat per item as packaged or served.  Exemptions to the saturated fat standard are granted for reduced fat cheese and part-skim mozzarella cheese, nuts and products consisting of only dried fruit with nuts and/or seeds with no added nutritive sweeteners or fat.
        4.  Transfat: contains 0 grams of trans fat per item as packaged or served.
        5.  Sugar must be no more than 35 percent by weight.
          1.  Exempt from the sugar standard are:
            1.  Dried whole fruits or vegetables;
            2.  Dried whole fruit or vegetable pieces;
            3.  Dehydrated fruits or vegetables with no added nutritive sweeteners; and
            4.  Dried fruits with nutritive sweeteners that are required for processing and/or palatability purposes (i.e., cranberries, blueberries, tart cherries).
        6.  Sodium:
          1.  Snacks contain no more than 200 mg sodium per item as packaged or served.
          2.  Entrees contain no more than 480 mg sodium per item as packaged or served.
        7.  Caffeine free, except for naturally occurring trace amounts, for elementary and middle school level.
        8.  Exempt from all nutrients standards on any day are:
          1.  Fresh, canned and frozen fruits or vegetables with no added ingredients except water.
          2.  Fruit packed in 100 percent juice, extra light or light syrup.
          3.  Canned vegetables that contain a small amount of sugar for processing purposes.
          4.  Sugar-free chewing gum.
        9.  Entrees in same or smaller portion served on the day or the day following in the National School Lunch or School Breakfast Programs are exempt from the nutrient standards for:
          1.  Calories;
          2.  Total fat;
          3.  Saturated fat;
          4.  Transfat;
          5.  Sodium; and
          6.  Sugar.
    2.  Beverages must be:
      1.  For elementary level students:
        1.  Plain water, carbonated or uncarbonated, with portion size unlimited;
        2.  Lowfat milk (unflavored), with portion size not to exceed 8 ounces and 150 calories;
        3.  Nonfat milk (including flavored), with portion size not to exceed 8 ounces and 150 calories;
        4.  Nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives, portion size not to exceed 8 ounces and 150 calories;
        5.  Full strength, unsweetened fruit or vegetable juices, portion size not to exceed 8 ounces and 120 calories;
        6.  Fruit and vegetable juice that is 100 percent juice diluted with water, carbonated or uncarbonated, and no added sugar or sweeteners with portion size not to exceed 8 ounces   and 120 calories;
        7.  Caffeine free, except for naturally occurring trace amounts.
      2.  For middle school level students:
        1.  Plain water, carbonated or uncarbonated, with portion size unlimited;
        2.  Lowfat milk (unflavored), portion size not to exceed 10 ounces and 190 calories;
        3.  Nonfat milk (including flavored), portion size not to exceed 10 ounces and 190 calories;
        4.  Nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives, portion size not to exceed 10 ounces and 190 calories;
        5.  Full strength, unsweetened fruit or vegetable juices, portion size not to exceed 10 ounces and 150 calories;
        6.  Fruit and vegetable juice that is 100 percent juice diluted with water, carbonated or uncarbonated, and no added sugar or sweeteners with portion size not to exceed 10 ounces and 150 calories;
        7.  Caffeine free, except for naturally occurring trace amounts.
      3.  For high school level students:
        1.  Plain water, carbonated or uncarbonated, with portion size unlimited;
        2.  Lowfat milk (unflavored), portion size not to exceed 12 ounces and 225 calories;
        3.  Nonfat milk (including flavored), portion size not to exceed 12 ounces and 225 calories;
        4.  Nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives, portion size not to exceed 12 ounces and 225 calories;
        5.  Full strength, unsweetened fruit or vegetable juices, portion size not to exceed 12 ounces and 180 calories;
        6.  Fruit and vegetable juice that is 100 percent juice diluted with water, carbonated or uncarbonated, and no added sugar or sweeteners with portion size not to exceed 12 ounces and 180 calories;
        7.  Low or no calorie beverage is less than 5 calories per 8 ounce serving or less than or equal to 10 calories per 20 fluid ounces, portion size not to exceed 20 ounce serving;
        8.  Other beverages are not to exceed 40 calories per 8 fluid ounces (or 60 calories per 12 fluid ounces) with portion size not to exceed 12 ounces.
    3.  Use the nutrient standard for the lowest grade group when mixed grades have open access to competitive foods.
      1.  “School day” means a student education day beginning at midnight and ending at the conclusion of afternoon student activities, such as athletic, music or drama practices, clubs, academic support and enrichment activities.
      2. “School campus” means all areas of property under the jurisdiction of the school that are accessible to students during the school day.
      3. “Snack” means a food that is generally regarded as supplementing a meal and includes, but is not limited to, chips, crackers, onion rings, nachos, french fries, doughnuts, cookies, pastries, cinnamon rolls and candy.

Nutrition Promotion and Nutrition Education

Nutrition promotion and nutrition education shall be a sequential and integrated focus on improving students’ eating behaviors, reflect evidence based strategies and be consistent with state and local district health education standards.

Nutrition education at all levels of the district’s curriculum shall include the following essential components designed to help students learn:

  1.  Age-appropriate nutritional knowledge, including the benefits of healthy eating, essential nutrients, nutritional deficiencies, principles of healthy weight management, the use and misuse of dietary supplements, safe food preparation, handling and storage and cultural diversity related to food and eating;
  2.  Age-appropriate nutrition-related skills, including but not limited to, planning a healthy meal, understanding and using food labels and critically evaluating nutrition information, misinformation and commercial food advertising; and
  3.  How to assess one’s personal eating habits, set goals for improvement and achieve those goals.

Food and Beverage Marketing

The district (i.e., school nutrition services, athletics department, PTA, PTO) will review existing contracts, new contracts and equipment and product purchase or replacement to reflect the applicable food and beverage marketing guidelines established by the district wellness policy.

“Food and beverage marketing” is defined as advertising and other promotions in schools. Food and beverage marketing often includes oral, written or graphic statements made for the purpose of promoting the sale of a food or beverage product made by the producer, manufacturer, seller or any other entity with a commercial interest in the product.

This term includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  1.  Brand names, trademarks, logos or tags, except when placed on a physically present food or beverage product or its container;
  2.  Displays, such as on vending machine exteriors;
  3.  Corporate brand, logo, name or trademark on school equipment, such as marquees, message boards, scoreboards or backboards.  Note: Immediate replacement of these items is not required; however, districts will replace or update scoreboards or other durable equipment when existing contracts are up for renewal or to the extent that is financially possible over time so that items are in compliance.
  4.  Corporate brand, logo, name or trademark on cups used for beverage dispensing, menu boards, coolers, trash cans and other food service equipment; as well as on posters, book covers, student assignment books or school supplies displayed, distributed, offered or sold by the district;
  5.  Advertisements in school publications or school mailings;
  6.  Free product samples, taste tests or coupons of a product, or free samples displaying advertising of a product.

Physical Activity and Physical Education

In order to insure students are afforded the opportunity to engage in physical activity and physical education in the school setting, the following guidelines apply:

  1.  Physical activity will be integrated across curricula and throughout the school day. Movement will be made a part of all classes or courses as part of a well-rounded education;
  2.  Physical education will be a course of study that focuses on students’ physical literacy and development of motor skills;
  3.  Physical education courses will be the environment where students learn, practice and are assessed on developmentally appropriate knowledge, skills and confidence to become physically literate;
  4.  All physical education classes will be taught by licensed physical education teachers and/or appropriately licensed teachers as outlined by the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC);
  5.  Daily recess period(s) will be provided that will not be used as a punishment or a reward.

Nutrition Guidelines and Food Services Operation

In order to support a school’s nutrition and food services operation as an essential partner in the educational mission of the district and its role in the district’s comprehensive nutrition program, the principal is responsible for ensuring:

  1.  The school encourages all students to participate in the school’s NSLP and SBP meal opportunities;
  2.  The school notifies families of need-based programs for free or reduced-price meals and encourages eligible families to apply;
  3.  The school’s NSLP and SBP maintains the confidentiality of students and families applying for or receiving free or reduced-priced meals in accordance with the National School Lunch Act;
  4.  The school’s NSLP and SBP operates to meet dietary specifications in accordance with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and applicable state laws and regulations;
  5.  The school sells or serves varied and nutritious food choices consistent with the applicable nutrition standards set by the USDA and the Oregon Smart Snacks Standards. A school or district, that operates or contracts the food service component of their NSLP and SBP, shall form a nutrition advisory committee comprised of staff, students and parents. Cultural norms and preferences will be considered;
  6.  Food prices set by the district are communicated to students and parents. District pricing strategies will encourage students to purchase full meals and nutritious items;
  1.  Procedures are in place to provide families, on request, information about the ingredients and nutritional value of the foods served;
  2.  Modified meals are prepared for students with special dietary needs:
    1.  The district will provide substitute foods to students with a disability2 that restricts their diet, when supported by a written statement from a state-licensed health care professional who is authorized to write medical prescriptions.
    2.  Such substitutions will be provided only when a medical statement from the licensed health care professional is on file at the school. The medical statement must state the nature of the child’s impairment so its effect on the student’s diet is understood, and what must be done to accommodate the impairment.
  3.  Food service equipment and facilities meet applicable local and state standards concerning health, safe food preparation, handling and storage, drinking water, sanitation and workplace safety;
  4.  Students are provided adequate time and space to eat meals in a pleasant and safe environment. School dining areas will be reviewed to ensure:
    1.  Tables and chairs are of the appropriate size for students;
    2.  Seating is not overcrowded;
    3.  Students have a relaxed environment;
    4.  Noise is not allowed to become excessive;
    5.  Rules for safe behavior are consistently enforced;
    6.  Tables and floors are cleaned between meal periods;
    7.  The physical structure of the eating area is in good repair; and
    8.  Appropriate supervision is provided.
  5.  The guidelines for reimbursable school meals shall not be less restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) of section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act (42 U.S.C. § 1779) and sections 9(f)(1) and 17(a) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. § 1758(f)(1), § 1766(a)), as those regulations and guidance apply to schools.

Competitive Food Sales

In keeping with federal regulations, the district controls the sale of all competitive foods. Accordingly, the district will select food items that meet the Oregon Smart Snacks Standards.

The sale of foods and beverages in competition with the district’s NSLP and SBP meals shall be permitted when all income from the food sales accrues to the benefit of the district’s nutrition and food services operation or a school or student organization as approved by the Board.

Other Foods Offered or Sold

Foods and beverages sold in classrooms or school-sponsored activities during the school day shall follow the Oregon Smart Snacks Standards.

Foods and beverages that meet or exceed the nutrition standards set by the USDA and the Oregon Smart Snacks Standards may be sold through fund raisers on the school campus during the school day.

Employee Wellness

The district’s Employee Wellness Program may include the following:

  1.  Health education and health promoting activities that focus on skill development and lifestyle behavior that change along with awareness building, information dissemination, access to facilities, and are preferably tailored to employee’s needs and interests;
  2.  Safe, supportive social and physical environments including organizational expectations about healthy behavior, and implementation of policy that promotes health and safety and reduces the risk of disease;
  3.  Linkage to related programs such as employee assistance programs, emergency care and programs that help employees balance work life and family life;
  4.  Education and resources to help employees make decisions about health care; and
  5.  Nutrition and fitness educational opportunities that may include but are not limited to, the distribution of educational and informational materials, and the arrangement of presentations and workshops that focus on healthy lifestyles, health assessments, fitness activities and other appropriate nutrition and physical activity related topics.

The district encourages participation from all employees. “Employees” are not limited to instructional staff (i.e., teachers and instructional assistants), but includes all administrators and support staff.

The following groups are seen as essential for establishing, implementing and sustaining an effective employee wellness program:

  1.  School personnel who implement existing wellness programs in the district (i.e., employee wellness committee);
  2.  District personnel who implement health programs for students (e.g., school health coordinator, school nurses, psychologist, health and physical educators, nutrition professionals, counselors and other staff); and
  3.  Decision makers who have the authority to approve policy and provide administrative support essential for a school wellness program (e.g., Board members, superintendents, human resource administrators, fiscal services administrators and principals).

Other Activities that Promote Student Wellness

The district will provide the following activities and encourage the following practices which promote local wellness:

  1.  Nonfood-related fund raisers;
  2.  Physical activity brain breaks during transitions from one subject to another;
  3.  Assemblies which focus on wellness issues such as the importance of breakfast, healthy beverages, and how students and staff can incorporate 60 minutes of physical activity into their day;
  4.  The use of alternates to food as rewards in the classroom;
  5.  Include wellness as a standing agenda item for school-based meetings (e.g., staff meetings, site council meetings, PTO).

Staff Development

Ongoing pre-service and professional development training opportunities for staff will be encouraged. Staff responsible for nutrition education will be encouraged to participate in professional development activities to effectively deliver the nutrition education program as planned. Nutrition and food service personnel will receive opportunities to participate in professional development activities that address strategies for promoting healthy eating behavior; food safety; maintaining safe, orderly and pleasant eating environments; and other topics directly relevant to the employee’s job duties. The principal and the Food Service Director are responsible to ensure such training is made available, including but not limited to, the following:

  1.  Personnel management;
  2.  Financial management and record keeping;
  3.  Cost- and labor-efficient food purchasing and preparation;
  4.  Sanitation and safe food handling, preparation and storage;
  5.  Planning menus for students with special needs and students of diverse cultural backgrounds;
  6.  Customer service and student and family involvement;
  7.  Marketing healthy meals;
  8.  Principles of nutrition education, including selected curriculum content and innovative nutrition teaching strategies; and
  9.  Assessment by staff of their own eating practices and increased awareness of behavioral messages staff provide as role models.

Family and Community Involvement

In order to promote family and community involvement in supporting and reinforcing nutrition education in the schools, the principal is responsible for ensuring:

  1.  Nutrition education materials and cafeteria menus are sent home with students;
  2.  Parents are encouraged to send healthy snacks/meals to school;
  3.  Parents and other family members are invited to periodically eat with their student in the cafeteria;
  4.  Families are invited to attend exhibitions of student nutrition projects or health fairs;
  5.  Nutrition education workshops and screening services are offered;
  6.  Nutrition education homework that students can do with their families is assigned (e.g., reading and interpreting food labels, reading nutrition-related newsletters, preparing healthy recipes, etc.);
  7.  Staff are encouraged to cooperate within their own schools and with other agencies and community groups to provide opportunities for student volunteer or paid work related to nutrition, as appropriate;
  8.  Staff encourages and provides support for parental involvement in their children’s physical education;
  9.  Materials promoting physical activity are sent home with students; and
  10.  Physical activity is a planned part of all school-community events.

Program Evaluation

In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the local wellness program in promoting healthy eating, increased physical activity among students, and to implement program changes as necessary to increase its effectiveness, the superintendent or designee is responsible for ensuring:

  1.  Board policy and this administrative regulation are implemented as written;
  2.  All building, grade-level nutrition education curricula and materials are assessed for accuracy, completeness, balance and consistency with state and local district educational goals and standards;
  3.  Nutrition education is provided throughout the student’s school years as part of the district’s age- appropriate, comprehensive nutrition program, and is aligned and coordinated with the Oregon Health Education Standards and school health education programs;
  4.  PE teachers deliver nutrition education through age-appropriate, culturally relevant, participatory activities that include social learning strategies and activities that are aligned and coordinated with the Oregon Health Education Standards and school health education programs;
  5.  PE teachers and school nutrition and food service personnel have undertaken joint project planning and action;
  6.  PE teachers have received curriculum-specific training;
  7.  PE teachers provide physical activity instruction and programs that meet the needs and interests of all students;
  8.  Families and community organizations are involved, to the extent practicable, in nutrition education; and
  9.  The Director of Teaching and Learning, the Food Services Director and school principals, as appropriate, will be charged with the operational responsibility of ensuring that the policy and administrative regulations are followed and will develop an evaluation plan to be used to assess the district’s level of compliance with state and federal requirements.